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On his show, Last Week Tonight, John Oliver absolutely demolished InfoWars.com conspiracy theorist, Alex Jones. A favorite of Donald Trump and almost six million other Americans who shouldn’t be allowed to vote, Alex Jones is known for pushing massively overpriced products to his listeners while speculating wildly about government conspiracies, liberal propaganda, and other nonsense that his listeners love.

Based on John Oliver’s segment, InfoWars is generating north of $45 million dollars a year, with an estimated two-thirds from products sold on the InfoWars website store. He sells his own products through his InfoWars Life brand, mainly vitamins and “nutraceuticals,” but also other stuff, like a $6 Bill Clinton rape whistle. I have to hand it to him, Jones does test his own products on himself, and he even uses his own Dr. Oz to endorse his nutritional supplements.

Image result for alex jones before and after photo
InfoWars.com

According to Oliver, Alex Jones’ radio program is a cleverly orchestrated four hour sales pitch designed to sell overpriced products to gullible Americans. While it may seem insane to most people, Jones’ conspiracy theories about gay frogs and refugees spreading diseases serve to sell the products he offers in his website store, including chocolate flavored drink made from powdered chicken bones.

“People pay Alex Jones $45 for a jar of chocolate flavored chicken juice, so anything is possible.” – John Oliver

InfoWars.com

While Oliver was shocked that InfoWars.com has a page dedicated to people donating money, “Support Us,” it’s actually a fairly common tactic used by conservative media websites. Mike Cernovich is especially effective at coercing donations out of his followers to support his “High Impact Journalism.” I’m sure their need for donations and alternative funding sources has only intensified since YouTube started preventing a good portion of their content from monetizing. People believe they are donating their money to support free and independent journalism (Jones claims to be fighting tyranny), which I suppose is the same reason you would subscribe to any other news source. The choice to fund InfoWars through a lifestyle brand, website store, and donations leads me to believe that they are unable to gain approval from reputable affiliate networks or advertisers, which isn’t a good sign for the quality of the content displayed on the website in question. However, if Jones’ claim that InfoWars makes more than $45 million dollars a year is true, his strategy is more than paying off – although I haven’t found any data to support or refute this claim (InfoWars Trademark Registration Filing).

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Truthfully, I don’t really mind that Alex Jones is profiting off amusing t-shirts of Kathy Griffin, but I do think it’s kind of shameful for him to be dealing “health” products to unsuspecting victims. I’m also HIGHLY disappointed that the Lord of the Rings article I screenshotted above had literally NOTHING to do with LOTR. It was a fucking bait-and-switch for a video contest Alex Jones is hosting. To make up for this letdown, here’s the scene I assume he was referencing as “showing the horrors of a migrant invasion.”

 

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