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An ongoing scam that targets unsuspecting individuals with threatening emails claiming to have hacked webcam or smartphone camera footage of those individuals watching porn (and potentially masturbating) has allegedly netted almost $1 million in bitcoin (BTC).

According to a recent report by Fortune, the scammers have sent millions of emails, often to people’s work emails, earning around $949,000 to date. The average payout is $593.56, or roughly 0.073 bitcoin.

As one security expert, Robert Hackett, explained to Fortune, the scam is likely a result of leaked data that is being mined to add extra specificity to the blackmail.

“[You should] check to see whether any accounts tied to that password appear in Have I Been Pwned, a searchable database that identifies what personal information of yours may have leaked as a result of various online breaches,” Hackett said last August. “If any accounts that once used that password pop up, then the extortionist likely scraped all of the information from one of these data dumps. Translation: The crook has not been monitoring your every keyboard touch, screenshot, and webcam image. Rather, the delinquent is bluffing—frightening unsuspecting victims into forking over cryptocurrency.”

The report indicates that the scammers also use threats to destroy data or even carry out a form of physical violence at the victim’s workplace to prompt payment. However, it’s worth remembering that the hacker is almost certainly bluffing about having webcam footage or any other embarrassing material and your company’s IT department is likely aware of this scam.

More: Scammed Porn Watchers Have Paid Nearly $1 Million in Bitcoin Blackmail
Useful: How (Not) To React When Your Cryptocurrency Is Stolen

Disclaimer: This article’s author has cryptocurrency holdings that can be tracked here. This article is for informational purposes only and should not be taken as investment advice. Always conduct your own due diligence before making investments.

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