via lyncconf.com

Tencent (TCEHY) is reportedly planning to expand its policy that requires players to use their real names when logging into the company’s games.

According to a recent post by Tencent on WeChat, the tech giant will check all its users’ identities against police databases by 2019, a process that started with Honour of Kings users last September.

“There will be 9 popular mobile games including independent research and development and agent distribution, and the access and activation of the health system will be completed in 2018,” reads the announcement. “After these 10 models, in 2019, the coverage of the health system will be extended to other mobile games and PC games.”

The initial restrictions came following reports that video games were causing rising levels of nearsightedness in children. The government reacted to the findings promptly by refusing to approve new games into the market, while pushing the country’s tech companies to implement new regulations. As of mid-August, no new releases have been approved, potentially creating a multi-year backlog of games.

Additionally, last July, Tencent began restricting play-time for users under the age of 12 to one hour a day while players aged 13-18 have been restricted to two hours a day.

TCEHY via Google Finance

As a result of these policies, shares of Tencent’s value has fallen significantly over the last 6 months. TCEHY, Tencent’s ADR shares, now trade for $37.40, giving the company a $356 billion market cap.

More: After “Glory of the King”, Tencent’s full line of game products will enable health systems
Related: Tencent Will Soon Require Chinese Gamers to Use Their Real Names